Resume B.Inggris= CONJUNCTION

Name: I Gusti Ngurah Thierry

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CONJUNCTION

Some words are satisfied spending an evening at home, alone, eating ice-cream right out of the
box, watching Seinfeld re-runs on TV, or reading a good book. Others aren't happy unless they're
out on the town, mixing it up with other words; they're joiners and they just can't help themselves.
A conjunction is a joiner, a word that connects (conjoins) parts of a sentence.
You can use a conjunction to link words, phrases, and clauses, as in the following example:
I ate the pizza and the pasta.
Call the movers when you are ready.


1.     Co-ordinating Conjunctions 

You use a co-ordinating conjunction ("and," "but," "or," "nor," "for," "so," or "yet") to join
individual words, phrases, and independent clauses. Note that you can also use the conjunctions
"but" and "for" as prepositions.
In the following sentences, each of the highlighted words is a co-ordinating conjunction:
Lilacs and violets are usually purple.
In this example, the co-ordinating conjunction "and" links two nouns.
This movie is particularly interesting to feminist film theorists, for the screenplay was
written by Mae
West.
In this example, the co-ordinating conjunction "for" is used to link two independent clauses.
Daniel's uncle claimed that he spent most of his youth dancing on rooftops and
swalloWing goldfish.
Here the co-ordinating conjunction "and" links two participle phrases ("dancing on rooftops" and
"swallowing goldfish") which act as adverbs describing the verb "spends."

2.     Subordinating Conjunctions 

A subordinating conjunction introduces a dependent clauseand indicates the nature of the
relationship among the independent clause(s) and the dependent clause(s).
The most common subordinating conjunctions are "after," "although," "as," "because," "before,"
"how," "if," "once," "since," "than," "that," "though," "till," "until," "when," "where," "whether," and
"while."
Each of the highlighted words in the following sentences is a subordinating conjunction:
After she had learned to drive, Alice felt more independent.
The subordinating conjunction "after" introduces the dependent clause "After she had learned to
drive."
If the paperwork arrives on time, your cheque will be mailed on Tuesday.
Similarly, the subordinating conjunction "if' introduces the dependent clause "If the paperwork
arrives on time."
Gerald had to begun his thesis over again when his computer crashed.
The subordinating conjunction "when" introduces the dependent clause "when his computer
crashed."
Midwifery advocates argue that home births are safer because the mother and baby are
exposed to fewer people and fewer germs.
In this sentence, the dependent clause "because the mother and baby are exposed to fewer
people and fewer germs" is introduced by the subordinating conjunction "because."

3.     Correlative Conjunctions 

Correlative conjunctions always appear in pairs - you use them to link equivalent sentence
elements. The most common correlative conjunctions are "both ... and," "either ... or," "neither ... nor,",
"not only ... but also," "so ... as," and "whether ... or." (Technically correlative conjunctions consist
simply of a co-ordinating conjunction linked to an adjectiveor adverb.)
The h'ighlighted words in the following sentences are correlative conjunctions:
Both my grandfather and my father worked in the steel plant.
In this sentence, the correlative conjunction "both ... and" is used to link the two noun phrases that
act as the compound subject of the sentence: "my grandfather" and "my father".
Bring either a Jel/o salad or a potato·scal/op.
Here the correlative conjunction "either ... or" links two noun phrases: "a Jello salad" and "a potato
scallop."
Corinne is trying to decide whether to go to medical school or to go to law school.
Similarly, the correlative conjunction "whether ... or" links the two infinitive phrases "to go to
medical school" and "to go to law school."
The explosion destroyed not only the school but also the neighboring pub.
In this example the correlative conjunction "not only ... but also" links the two noun phrases ("the
school" and "neighboring pub") which act as direct objects.
Note: some words which appear as conjunctions can also appear as prepositions or as adverbs

Refferal:
English One, Reading Text book STIKOM SURABAYA, " Perpustakaan, Nomor Induk Buku 25551. Rak 425 PUS E

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